Globe’s 0000 Premiere in Costa Mesa: Art!

posted by / Blogs, Editorial / August 4, 2011

Inside the warehouse, as things get started.

Inside the warehouse, as things get started.

Night falls.

Night falls.

Dystopian car skeletons part the crowd.

Dystopian car skeletons part the crowd.

Hordes arrive.

Hordes arrive.

Hordes congregate.

Hordes congregate.

The citizens of the Globe.

The citizens of the Globe.

Blurry in the VIP.

Blurry in the VIP.

The projector fires and all eyes turn.

The projector fires and all eyes turn.

Back inside the warehouse bar zone, where the vodka and tequila were quickly demolished. Beer alone remained.

Back inside the warehouse bar zone, where the vodka and tequila were quickly demolished. Beer alone remained.

That there is a teepee.

That there is a teepee.

Joel Centeio.

Joel Centeio.

Charlie Smith and Circe Wallace.

Charlie Smith and Circe Wallace.

Chippa Wilson and Riley Blakeway.

Chippa Wilson and Riley Blakeway.

Dion Agius's line with Globe.

Dion Agius's line with Globe.

DJ Struntz and Dion.

DJ Struntz and Dion.

Paul Fisher.

Paul Fisher.

Jack Freestone.

Jack Freestone.

Jaime Parkhurst.

Jaime Parkhurst.

Jodi, Nate Tyler and Skindog.

Jodi, Nate Tyler and Skindog.

Parker Coffin and friends.

Parker Coffin and friends.

Ricky Whitlock.

Ricky Whitlock.

Tom Carey and Nate Vandergast.

Tom Carey and Nate Vandergast.

Warren, Barron and Grady.

Warren, Barron and Grady.

 

Last night was one of the greatest in modern surf history. Joe G and Globe’s 35-minute epic 0000 premiered in a dingy warehouse in Costa Mesa.

And it was art.

The crowd who gathered thick, clumped together and bonded by resin-singed air and deathly tequila, could hardly wait. They stood T-shirted shoulder to bare-skinned shoulder to leather-shirted shoulder in an American Indian apocalypse. There was a teepee and classic muscle cars.

Beer was at a premium. The lines at the bars stretched into eternity, a preview of the real American Indian apocalypse. Everyone who matters in surfing was there and that is everyone who matters. Luke Stedman was there and so was Damien Fahrenfort.

And then the film played.

And it was art.

Shot in film with a freshly created soundtrack by Canadian awesome Black Mountain, it danced on the screen. Dion spun in slow motion in the best surf fashion seen since Morning of the Earth. Nate Tyler surfed as smooth as Barry White. Damien Hobgood cruised like butter. Yadin Nicol pushed the limits of amazing and all in blue. Taj looked like he was having fun, which looked like so much fun. CJ Hobgood might have stolen the entire show. He carved and punted and got lipped in the head by monster French things. I love CJ and he, he is, right now, the most relevant thing in surfing. Funny and fresh. Who saw that coming?

And Joe G. Joe G made art. The pacing and the flow and the way it was filmed all in film. The women who were hip and gorgeous. The locations perfect. Art. Film.

I love Chris Coté, and Transworld also premiered a film elsewhere at the same time, but the night belonged to Joe G. And the night will go down in modern surf history. —Chas Smith

 

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