Quiksilver Explains Why The Eddie Didn’t Run

Eddie didn’t go. Luke Sherpardson did. Clip: Eric Sterman

The Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau is an invite only big wave event that only runs when Waimea Bay is bigger than 20-feet. Two days ago, Waimea Bay was bigger than 20-feet. The Eddie didn’t run. You were angry!

Maybe not really angry, but at least fake angry and a little bit confused. Some people got hung up on the but you said! side of things and in the absence of a webcast, they were sullenly forced to spend their entire workday actually…working. Others drank tall boys of Molson Ice and proceeded to hurl derogatory remarks at Quiksilver’s social media channels. Everybody has a different way of coping.

But the story doesn’t end there. A few hours ago, Quik posted this Instagram:

Let’s set the story straight, the team here at Quiksilver want The Eddie to run more than anyone. However we also want it to be a fair event contested in conditions Eddie Aikau himself would have approved of. For this prestigious event to get the green light the event criteria must be met. The waves MUST be in 20 foot plus range for an entire contestable 8-hour period. That means from 8am to 4pm Waimea Bay must be bigger than 20 foot. The judging format for The Eddie is different to every other event in the world. The surfers waves in the first heat are judged against surfers waves in the last heat. Therefore if we ran the event yesterday, where the waves didn’t peak until the afternoon, the first three heats would have been surfed in smaller, lesser, unfair conditions. The event window remains open until February 29th and another storm is forming for next week. Although it’s a long way out, we have everything crossed that it will produce the waves we need to run this amazing spectacle of a surfing event. Any questions, hit us in the comments and we will do our best to make sure they are answered. #EddieWouldGo.

A photo posted by @quiksilver on

Let’s set the story straight, the team here at Quiksilver want The Eddie to run more than anyone. However we also want it to be a fair event contested in conditions Eddie Aikau himself would have approved of.

For this prestigious event to get the green light the event criteria must be met. The waves MUST be in 20 foot plus range for an entire contestable 8-hour period. That means from 8am to 4pm Waimea Bay must be bigger than 20 foot.

The judging format for The Eddie is different to every other event in the world. The surfers waves in the first heat are judged against surfers waves in the last heat. Therefore if we ran the event yesterday, where the waves didn’t peak until the afternoon, the first three heats would have been surfed in smaller, lesser, unfair conditions.

The event window remains open until February 29th and another storm is forming for next week. Although it’s a long way out, we have everything crossed that it will produce the waves we need to run this amazing spectacle we call a surfing event.

Any questions, hit us in the comments and we will do our best to make sure they are answered.

#EddieWouldGo.

So there. Closure. The simple explanation is that the waves weren’t big enough for long enough. The complex explanation is that Slater would’ve been too busy surfing in the event and wouldn’t have been available to rescue that baby. Once Baywatch, always Baywatch, folks.