Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image
Gallery Image

East Coast OZ Goes Haywire

Surfing on Australia’s eastern seaboard means very different things to very different people.

If you’re from Queensland, it probably means righthand points that leave you weak in the calves. If you’re from Northern New South Wales, it probably means beachbreaks and wedges and sharks – lots of sharks. If you’re from Sydney or south, it probably means riding waves that weren’t exactly meant to be ridden, but you try to ride them anyways.

A couple days ago, a massive storm called a “super cell” hit Australia’s east coast, lighting up every inch of sand and rock between the Sunshine Coast and the southern tip of New South Wales. As the storm tracked southward, the wind started clicking offshore. Town by town, westerlies groomed the tempered sea until every spot was somewhere between five and twenty feet of storybook perfection.

You’ve already seen what happened at Cape Fear. And while we will never forget those historic performances at one of the world’s sketchiest slabs, it’s important to highlight the other waves ridden during this stretch of swell. Like on the Sunshine coast, where Julian Wilson took out his anger from a R2 loss by dismantling uncommonly good waves. Or in Newcastle, where Dickson Beach said ¡Bienvenidos! and displayed its best Puerto impersonation. Or with Leroy Bellett and Scott Dennis, who continued to push the envelope in surf photography and slab survival.

But that’s enough talking. We’ll let the pictures tell the rest of the story.