We reached out to our friends in Japan to try to identify all of the surfers, but someone how guys like this managed to slip under the radar... and under the lip.

We reached out to our friends in Japan to try to identify all of the surfers, but somehow guys like this managed to slip under the radar... and under the lip.

Yujiro Tsuji with his back against a wall.

Yujiro Tsuji with his back against the wall.

Kenta Hayashi, at home.

Kenta Hayashi, relaxed at home with open arms.

An anonymous poet and his song.

Anonymously yours.

Reki Nagahara makes a splash.

Reki Nagahara's rain dance.

Ha! Classic Nakano, always going left.

Being goofyfooted is universal. We don't know very much about him, but our money says that Nakano always goes left.

Yoshiji makes himself disappear.

Yoshiji makes himself disappear.

Another unidentifiable in black and white.

This dude was too deep to identify. And maybe that's for the best.

Photos: Japan Locals

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All Photos: Brent Bielmann

 

A few months back, we were lucky enough to ink Brent Bielmann on as a Senior Photographer. We were abuzz about the addition and we wanted to get the big man on a trip stat. With an eye fixed on Japan, we watched the charts and waited for a perfect opportunity. When one arose, Brent jumped over with Anthony Walsh, Zeke Lau and Cheyne Magnusson. They returned with photos, clips and big grins — which you will see in an upcoming issue of SURFING and in Body Glove’s Live From The Moon. They also returned with an electrified respect for Japanese locals. Here are eight photos of their foreign friends, and an anecdote from Brent about his hosts.

Brent: Respect takes on a whole new meaning in Japan, which is definitely a cool thing to experience. The guys who surf there are gnarly. I’m reluctant to say that they’re more serious in the water because they still have a lot of fun, but it’s definitely a different vibe from anywhere else I’ve been. We went there and met up with our buddy Shinte who kind of acted as our guide for the trip. Apparently, the locals where we surfing are pretty nuts — Shinte told us stories about a few of the guys “making people disappear.” So he wanted to make sure that we met all of them and introduced ourselves before we paddled out and started taking waves. We showed up at the spot and their whole crew was there just checking us out, wondering what our deal was. It felt pretty tense at first, but we went around and shook hands with every single guy and they warmed up. They ended up being some of the nicest people I’ve ever met.

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